Category Archives: Alcoholism

10 Most Common Signs of Addiction to Drugs or Alcohol

Anyone with these symptoms should seek treatment right away.

1. Cravings

A person may undergo more intense urges or cravings for the drug of choice or alcohol as the addiction progresses.

2. Physical dependence

A physical reliance or dependency on drugs develops as a person becomes accustomed to the constant presence and influence of the substance. The physiological changes that go along with this process may cause the individual to feel poorly or to function inadequately when the drug leaves the system.

3. Tolerance

Persistent use of a substance builds up a tolerance that will mean the individual will need for more of the drug or alcohol to achieve the desired effects.

4. Withdrawal symptoms

Some individuals experience symptoms of withdrawal with an abrupt end to using or when attempting to wean off the substance over a period of time. This is a strong indication of physiological dependency is developing.

5. Poor judgement

An individual is addicted to drugs or alcohol is often likely to do anything to obtain the substance, including such risky behaviors such as stealing, lying, engaging in selling drugs or unsafe sexual activity or other crimes that could lead to an arrest or jail

Drugs and Alcohol

6. Drug-seeking

A person who abuses drugs regularly will exhibit drug seeking behavior and will routinely attempt to obtain prescription medications, such as opioids or tranquilizers, from medical facilities, such as emergency rooms and doctors’ offices.

7. Financial problems

A person may spend large amounts of money, drain bank accounts, and destroy a budget in order to get the drug. This is a major red flag and should not be ignored.

8. Neglecting obligations

A classic sign of addiction is when an individual opts to using or getting the drug in preference to meeting work or personal responsibilities.

9. Fostering unhealthy alliances

A person with a drug or alcohol dependency often seeks out those with similar habits. These new groups may also encourage other unhealthy habits.

10. Isolation

An addict will usually withdraw and isolate from others, hiding drug use from friends and family. The behavior may occur because of the perceived stigma of a substance addiction or increased depression, anxiety or paranoia resulting from substance abuse.

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Summertime Setback Series – Part Two

Summertime Alcohol Relapse

If you’ve spent your previous summers under the influence of alcohol, a sober summer is a formidable task. Fortunately, there are many wonderful relapse prevention strategies and sober things to do that will keep you feeling happy and healthy

Summer is, of course, about sunny beaches, cookouts, and Fourth of July fireworks. Grassy lawns and relaxing gardens are perfect for a cold beer or a refreshing cocktail and you see a lot of people, including friends and family, enjoying their drinks outside. This increase in public drinking means that a recovering alcoholic will be faced with more temptation under the guise of carefree, good times in the sun, making them forget that they have an alcohol problem.

Why do people relapse during the summer?

There are a number of reasons for why newly sober people may be at high risk of relapse during the summer months.

  • Most people are thinking about summer vacation and the summer celebrations such as July Fourth. Those who are recovering from alcoholism may associate vacation time with heavy drinking and find it difficult to imagine have a good time without alcohol.
  • As outdoor events are numerous, there tends to be more drinking outside during the summer months. Tempting as it may be, do not romance the drink as you watch people looking as if they are having a good time because they have a drink in hand.
  • The sunny, warm weather triggers all types of positive emotions, but the risk with this is that the individual may be feeling so positive that they forget that they have an alcohol problem. The person may mistake these positive emotions as a sign that they are now safe to drink again.

Preventing relapse during the summer months

Here are a few suggestions for helping prevent relapse during the summer months.

  • Talk it out. If the thought of relapse worries you, share those worries with others. Discuss these feelings at your next recovery group meeting or attend more meetings as to reinforce determination to stay sober. Call on family and close friends for comfort and reassurance as they will help look out for you. Most importantly, seek help immediately and do not ignore your feelings if they seem to be getting out of control.
  • Nix nostalgia. Avoid romancing the drink as you watch your friends enjoying alcoholic beverages. This is simply false nostalgia – snap back to reality. You know that alcohol is a problem and remember the pain caused by your addiction. If you do not feel very secure in your sobriety, it is best to avoid bars – only go to these places if you have a valid reason for doing so.
  • Explore options. The hot sun is not a reason to drink an alcoholic beverage. It dehydrates your body and is much more harmful on a hot, sunny day. There are many better options to quench your thirst – ice water – iced tea – and to a lesser degree, cold sodas. Bring your own nonalcoholic drinks to barbeques, to the beach, or wherever your friends and family gather over the summer. It is important to drink plenty of water on those days when it is hot outside – carry a bottle with you everywhere. The risk is that if you become thirsty it may trigger intense cravings for alcohol.
  • Move and keep moving.  Become physically active and direct your energy into productive and fun exercise. Not only is it good for the body, it is good for your mental well-being too. Hike – bike ride – train for a half marathon. There are so many things to do outside and they are all better and easier to without alcohol.
  • Be thankful and reflect. Look over your accomplishments in your efforts to stay sober and how far you have come in your recovery. Remind yourself of all the reasons to stay sober. Reflect on those who love you and who are supporting you in recovery.

Staying sober on vacation

Most of us take a vacation during the summer and often travel involves a destination of sun, fun and evening gatherings. Though this break is usually well-deserved, those who have had drinking problems often indulged in partying to excess.  It may be extremely difficult to imagine fun without alcohol. Here are a few suggestions to remain sober during a vacation:

  • Alcoholics Anonymous recommends that members do not make any major changes in the first year sobriety. A vacation could be a major change if not part of an annual routine.
  • Ensure that the people you are vacationing with understand and respect your need to stay sober.
  • Try to have another person in recovery be part of your vacation.
  • Check the availability of some recovery meetings at the location you will be staying.
  • Take along some recovery resources such as books – with the availability of tablet devices, it is much easier to access to e-books, videos and forums.
  • Speak to your therapist about your vacation plans before you leave.
  • Make sure that there are going to be many non-drinking activities available for you on this trip.
  • If you want a specialty beverage, try a non-alcoholic cocktail.
  • Make sure when ordering food in a restaurant that it contains no alcohol. If you are unsure, it is always best to ask.
  • Online options such as Skype are a good way to stay in touch with your recovery friends back at home.

Staying sober at parties

Prior to attending summer gatherings and parties, it is important for a recovering person to make a promise not let the event breakdown a hard-won abstinence.

It is important to note that those who are recovering from substance abuse that did not include alcohol are still advised to abstain from alcohol consumption. Any intoxication qualifies as a relapse. Recovering individuals should bring their own non-alcoholic beverage to a party to avoid going to the bar or drink table. Also, people are less likely to offer a drink to a person who already has a beverage. For this same reason, it is recommended to keep a non-alcoholic drink in one’s hand throughout the party. To avoid any drink confusion after putting down a beverage to dance or use the bathroom, it is always best to get a fresh drink – so it is wise to bring more than one beverage to a party in the event the host runs out of non-alcoholic beverages.

Find support during the summer months

Here are some options for support during the summer months:

  • Your addiction therapist is an excellent source for support and encouragement.
  • Regular attendance at recovery meetings is a good way to get support during the summer months
  • Friends who have been sober for a long time are usually a good source for advice and support.
  • Friends who have never had a problem with addiction can be a very helpful provided they respect your situation related to alcohol.

If you are newly sober, you may worry about how you are going to manage during the summer months, as this may be a time of year where you have traditionally used alcohol heavily. The good news is that so long as you follow the previous steps to protect your sobriety, you may be about to enjoy the best summer ever.

Good luck and Happy Summer!

 

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Recovery Coach Tom Rohrer – Signs of Alcohol Abuse: When Drinking Becomes a Problem

Alcohol abuse can have serious long-term effects on you and the people around you. The sooner you get help, the better it will be for you and your loved ones. Here are some signs of alcohol abuse.

Get a copy of my book now! Thriving Beyond Addiction is a great tool to help you recover fast. Visit my website for more information www.thrivingbeyondaddiction.com/sample-page/healthy-living

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Recovery Coach Tom Rohrer – Tips To Avoid Addiction

You can’t control who your parents are, the choices they made or the community you grew up in, but you are not powerless. Here are some tips to avoid addiction.

Thriving Beyond Addiction is a great tool in fighting addiction. Visit us here www.thrivingbeyondaddiction.com/sample-page/healthy-living and find out more about this book.

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Recovery Coach Tom Rohrer – Questions For An Alcoholic

Are you concerned about the role alcohol plays in your life? This questions will help you determine if you or someone you know needs to find out more about alcoholism.
 

 
Are these questions all answered by YES? Then you must consult an expert now… I can help you fight addiction to alcohol. Call me now for a free consultation 925-595-6433

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Recovery Coach Tom Rohrer – Ways to Fight Alcohol Addiction

Alcohol addiction does not have to be a prison sentence. Recovery can give you freedom from addiction and the adverse repercussions of addiction. Here are ways to fight alcohol addiction that are meant to supplement treatment from an alcohol abuse and addiction program.
 

 
If you or someone you love is suffering from the effects of alcohol abuse, substance addiction or any other type of addiction, please call me today at 925-595-6433

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