Category Archives: Food for Thought!

A NEW BEGINNING: INTRODUCTION INTO RECOVERY

Breathe deeply and slowly!

Welcome to recovery. I bet it took you a long time to get here. Breathe. Your life is about to change for the better – if you stay on your recovery road. You may experience some hard bumps along the way, but it is worth the effort to work through and smooth them out. If you don’t return to using, you WILL realize many positive changes in your life. Until you start recovery, you are stuck in “Nowhere Land,” with your mind confused and your heart caught between two worlds. Treatment professionals call this the pre-treatment stage. During the pre-treatment stage, your addict self falsely believes using is the answer to all your problems, while the dopamine in your brain, altered by your addiction, incorrectly sends you the message that you need to use to survive. At the same time, you know you need to change your lifestyle. What a struggle!

It takes courage to start recovery, courage you have shown even by picking up this book to learn how to change your life for the better. By using your inner and outer resources, you can keep traveling along your recovery road, and be successful, no matter what is thrown your way. Stay courageous! You can do it!

Recovery begins as you commit!

To Get a Good Start:

  • Contact your physician! Have a check-up! Be honest! Follow all medical advice.
  • Practice abstinence from all addictive substances and behaviors.
  • Join a recovery program. Sit there, listen, and take it all in. You do not have to do a thing. Magic can happen if you just keep going back.
  • Accept recovery into your life. It takes work, but consider whatever event that got you into recovery as a blessing. Do whatever it takes to stay the course. As you progress along your path, acknowledge, nurture, and reward yourself.

It's in Your Hands - Honesty, Acceptance, Nutrition, Direction, Support - Five Keys for recovery!

Learn about the PINK CLOUD that is experienced in early recovery. You may not consciously want to use, the abstinence may feel wonderful, but when this “pink cloud” collapses (and it will), your fall to earthly reality will be much easier if you have begun building your recovery structure.

See yourself successfully completing your first steps!

If you want to start your recovery, don’t allow your addict self to sabotage what you want by indulging in, “I’ll do it soon,” or “I’ll be okay,” type of thinking. If you truly cannot begin now, set yourself up for success by taking action to ensure that you will follow through ASAP. Examples of taking action are: contacting a referral center and asking for help; making an appointment with a counselor for the first possible appointment time; going to a self-help support group meeting; or signing a clear and specific, time-limited contract with yourself and putting it in a visible place. Whatever you decide to do, commit, take whatever action you can, and follow through.

READY? GREAT! LET’S GET STARTED!

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AN OVERVIEW: THE 7 TASK AREAS OF YOUR RECOVERING FUTURE MODEL

View Your Recovering Future Twice Daily

In early recovery, it’s generally best to follow a program that has worked for others. There’s no one approach that’s best for everyone. Today, you should have several options available to choose from. In early recovery, select a program that is easy and simple for you to follow. Your first program doesn’t need to be complicated or intense.

A thriving life demands an adaptable, flexible, and expandable style. The order of the following task areas is only a suggestion; however, all seven are important.

 Your Approach:   Learning and Using Effective Resources – How you enter and think about recovery highly affects your outcome.

Find: Support, guidance, modeling.

Develop: Recovery and spiritual practices.

Your Recovery Skills:  Foundation – Follow a path that has proven its value. Set up your recovery plan for primary and secondary addictions, create a relapse prevention plan, learn tools and strategies, and use reminders to remember to practice and to employ these tools and strategies often.

Your Awareness Opportunity – Use each opportunity to learn about yourself, recovery and relapse issues, tools and strategies, and faith; take responsibility, make clearer and better choices. Without awareness you have no chance to succeed.

Managing Your Life:  Responsibility – Managing change: Take care of yourself by developing your mental, emotional, nutritional, physical, social, and spiritual health, as well as your recovery and relationships. Find a recovery guide (someone who has already done this) to help you.

Your Personal Work:  Resolving and Managing Issues – Problem solving model: Examine addictions, family history, problem solving and conflict resolution styles; deal with emotions, physical and relationship issues, relapse triggers and symptoms, and Post Acute Withdrawal Symptoms (PAWS).

Your Personal Growth Expanding, Engaging, and Living Fully – Observe, assess, and evolve; pursue social, emotional, physical, and spiritual growth; engage in the purposeful life that you want.

Accept and Embrace Mental-Emotional Shifts

Your Mental Shifts:  Expanding Perception and Focus – Major mental and emotional (paradigm) shifts will happen when you gain significant knowledge and perspective about yourself. Your attitudes, beliefs, emotions, identity, self-esteem, recovery, and spirituality will all be affected and change.

 

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Summertime Setback Series – Part Three

Binge Eating Disorder

Binge Eating Disorder or BED is a food disorder in which a person frequently consumes large amounts of food in short periods and suffers severe guilt when finished. This disorder is exacerbated by anxiety and insecurity and, in turn, causes the vicious cycle to repeat over and over again. An individual who suffers from BED understands that it is cruel, humiliating and can strike at any moment of vulnerability.

During months where routine in predictable – September to June for those who work or are in school – binge eating can be easy enough to hide. Everyday practices are its best cover as we are in more control of our lives during these months. However, BED should not be dismissed during this time, nor should its warning signs be ignored.

During the holiday months, BED becomes much more punitive and often unbearable for those who experience the disorder.

Now that summer is here, for most people that usually means going to the beach with friends, hanging out by the pool, endless summer cookouts, shorts and tank tops, and the anxieties that can arise along with wearing a swimsuit. If you are one of the millions with an eating disorder, this time of year may make it even harder to manage your symptoms. Body image issues often resurface and maintaining a healthy relationship with food becomes more challenging.

Summer is a time to relax and recharge, but it is important to stay committed to your recovery. Here’s why:

  • The increased “free time” that occurs during summer tends to create more “alone time” and eating disorder behaviors thrive in isolation and secrecy.
  • Body image issues may increase during summer months, as we tend to wear less clothing and show more skin.
  • Wearing a bathing suit can be particularly challenging for many.
  • The lack of structure in the summer months can lead to unhealthy routines like skipping meals or altering your normal sleep habits. This can make eating disorder and mental health symptoms worse.
  • Changes in the summer schedule can lead to an increase in physical activity and excessive exercise.
  • Co-occurring mental health issues like depression and substance abuse benefit from treatment and are not likely to go away in summer months.
  • Getting back into activities with “old friends” or even “new friends” can add to the social demand and thus increase overall stress.
  • Eating disorder behaviors may be exacerbated if stress increases due to new activities (taking courses or starting a new job) in summer.
  • Eating disorders are challenging to treat, require specialized treatment and have a high relapse rate. Anorexia nervosa, in particular, has the highest mortality rate of all mental health issues.
  • The longer that you wait to seek help for an eating disorder, the sicker you may become, making future treatment even more challenging.

But if you are struggling, or know that a loved one is struggling, do not delay seeking help any time of year. Call a professional for guidance. The courage you draw upon to choose treatment now will inevitably lead to improved outcomes and improved well-being.

Important information about Binge Eating Disorder

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH),Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most commonly diagnosed eating disorder in the country and is defined by eating large quantities of food ” as much as 5,000-15,000 calories ” in a single sitting, then experiencing feelings of guilt and shame as a result. Binge sessions may occur after a period of stringent caloric restriction or dieting and they are often characterized by feelings of a loss of control.

Those who struggle with binge eating are often overweight or obese and, as a result, are likely to struggle with medical problems such as heart disease, some cancers, high blood pressure, gallbladder disease, high levels of “bad” cholesterol, and/or type II diabetes.

  • An estimated two-thirds of people living with binge eating disorder are obese.
  • Binge eating contributes to the development of obesity, which in turn can trigger a host of chronic health disorders, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
  • Binge eating disorder is the most commonly diagnosed eating disorder, and an estimated 3 percent of Americans are living with the problem. Additionally, about 50 percent of patients with BED are also diagnosed with depression, 24 percent are diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and 44 percent self-report struggling with eating habit management.
  • Cortisol released during the stress response and the corresponding storage of fat in the abdominal area are increased issues for those living with BED and obesity as compared to the general public, according to a study published in the journal Appetite. Stress can also be a trigger for binge eating.
  • Binge eating has been linked to increased rates of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, especially if the person with BED struggles with feelings of low self-worth and/or feels lacking.
  • People living with binge eating disorder very often also struggle with disrupted sleep patterns, including difficulty falling asleep, waking at night to eat, and struggling to go back to sleep.
  • The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases reports that people living with binge eating disorder are at higher risk of developing such health problems as headaches, joint and muscle pain, sleep apnea, digestive problems, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis, kidney disease, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, certain cancers, and fatty liver disease. They also experience difficulty in getting or maintaining a healthy pregnancy.

For BED victims, though it may not feel like it now, it does get better. Here are a few extra tips to help with your recovery, keep you on track and reduce the possibility of relapse.

  • Set regular times for eating, but be careful about it. Do not starve yourself by allocating inconvenient times for a meal. The more control you have over food, the more you will find control in your mind.
  • Look at food in a positive manner. Food is not an enemy but key to your survival. Learn to manage food intake to your benefit and overall health.

Most importantly, accept that some days are better than others. Do not blame yourself if you don’t feel invincible every day. Accept that you had a moment of weakness and continue to strive for a better day and a healthier future.

Good luck and have a Happy Summer!

 

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Summertime Setback Series – Part Two

Summertime Alcohol Relapse

If you’ve spent your previous summers under the influence of alcohol, a sober summer is a formidable task. Fortunately, there are many wonderful relapse prevention strategies and sober things to do that will keep you feeling happy and healthy

Summer is, of course, about sunny beaches, cookouts, and Fourth of July fireworks. Grassy lawns and relaxing gardens are perfect for a cold beer or a refreshing cocktail and you see a lot of people, including friends and family, enjoying their drinks outside. This increase in public drinking means that a recovering alcoholic will be faced with more temptation under the guise of carefree, good times in the sun, making them forget that they have an alcohol problem.

Why do people relapse during the summer?

There are a number of reasons for why newly sober people may be at high risk of relapse during the summer months.

  • Most people are thinking about summer vacation and the summer celebrations such as July Fourth. Those who are recovering from alcoholism may associate vacation time with heavy drinking and find it difficult to imagine have a good time without alcohol.
  • As outdoor events are numerous, there tends to be more drinking outside during the summer months. Tempting as it may be, do not romance the drink as you watch people looking as if they are having a good time because they have a drink in hand.
  • The sunny, warm weather triggers all types of positive emotions, but the risk with this is that the individual may be feeling so positive that they forget that they have an alcohol problem. The person may mistake these positive emotions as a sign that they are now safe to drink again.

Preventing relapse during the summer months

Here are a few suggestions for helping prevent relapse during the summer months.

  • Talk it out. If the thought of relapse worries you, share those worries with others. Discuss these feelings at your next recovery group meeting or attend more meetings as to reinforce determination to stay sober. Call on family and close friends for comfort and reassurance as they will help look out for you. Most importantly, seek help immediately and do not ignore your feelings if they seem to be getting out of control.
  • Nix nostalgia. Avoid romancing the drink as you watch your friends enjoying alcoholic beverages. This is simply false nostalgia – snap back to reality. You know that alcohol is a problem and remember the pain caused by your addiction. If you do not feel very secure in your sobriety, it is best to avoid bars – only go to these places if you have a valid reason for doing so.
  • Explore options. The hot sun is not a reason to drink an alcoholic beverage. It dehydrates your body and is much more harmful on a hot, sunny day. There are many better options to quench your thirst – ice water – iced tea – and to a lesser degree, cold sodas. Bring your own nonalcoholic drinks to barbeques, to the beach, or wherever your friends and family gather over the summer. It is important to drink plenty of water on those days when it is hot outside – carry a bottle with you everywhere. The risk is that if you become thirsty it may trigger intense cravings for alcohol.
  • Move and keep moving.  Become physically active and direct your energy into productive and fun exercise. Not only is it good for the body, it is good for your mental well-being too. Hike – bike ride – train for a half marathon. There are so many things to do outside and they are all better and easier to without alcohol.
  • Be thankful and reflect. Look over your accomplishments in your efforts to stay sober and how far you have come in your recovery. Remind yourself of all the reasons to stay sober. Reflect on those who love you and who are supporting you in recovery.

Staying sober on vacation

Most of us take a vacation during the summer and often travel involves a destination of sun, fun and evening gatherings. Though this break is usually well-deserved, those who have had drinking problems often indulged in partying to excess.  It may be extremely difficult to imagine fun without alcohol. Here are a few suggestions to remain sober during a vacation:

  • Alcoholics Anonymous recommends that members do not make any major changes in the first year sobriety. A vacation could be a major change if not part of an annual routine.
  • Ensure that the people you are vacationing with understand and respect your need to stay sober.
  • Try to have another person in recovery be part of your vacation.
  • Check the availability of some recovery meetings at the location you will be staying.
  • Take along some recovery resources such as books – with the availability of tablet devices, it is much easier to access to e-books, videos and forums.
  • Speak to your therapist about your vacation plans before you leave.
  • Make sure that there are going to be many non-drinking activities available for you on this trip.
  • If you want a specialty beverage, try a non-alcoholic cocktail.
  • Make sure when ordering food in a restaurant that it contains no alcohol. If you are unsure, it is always best to ask.
  • Online options such as Skype are a good way to stay in touch with your recovery friends back at home.

Staying sober at parties

Prior to attending summer gatherings and parties, it is important for a recovering person to make a promise not let the event breakdown a hard-won abstinence.

It is important to note that those who are recovering from substance abuse that did not include alcohol are still advised to abstain from alcohol consumption. Any intoxication qualifies as a relapse. Recovering individuals should bring their own non-alcoholic beverage to a party to avoid going to the bar or drink table. Also, people are less likely to offer a drink to a person who already has a beverage. For this same reason, it is recommended to keep a non-alcoholic drink in one’s hand throughout the party. To avoid any drink confusion after putting down a beverage to dance or use the bathroom, it is always best to get a fresh drink – so it is wise to bring more than one beverage to a party in the event the host runs out of non-alcoholic beverages.

Find support during the summer months

Here are some options for support during the summer months:

  • Your addiction therapist is an excellent source for support and encouragement.
  • Regular attendance at recovery meetings is a good way to get support during the summer months
  • Friends who have been sober for a long time are usually a good source for advice and support.
  • Friends who have never had a problem with addiction can be a very helpful provided they respect your situation related to alcohol.

If you are newly sober, you may worry about how you are going to manage during the summer months, as this may be a time of year where you have traditionally used alcohol heavily. The good news is that so long as you follow the previous steps to protect your sobriety, you may be about to enjoy the best summer ever.

Good luck and Happy Summer!

 

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