A NEW BEGINNING: INTRODUCTION INTO RECOVERY

Breathe deeply and slowly!

Welcome to recovery. I bet it took you a long time to get here. Breathe. Your life is about to change for the better – if you stay on your recovery road. You may experience some hard bumps along the way, but it is worth the effort to work through and smooth them out. If you don’t return to using, you WILL realize many positive changes in your life. Until you start recovery, you are stuck in “Nowhere Land,” with your mind confused and your heart caught between two worlds. Treatment professionals call this the pre-treatment stage. During the pre-treatment stage, your addict self falsely believes using is the answer to all your problems, while the dopamine in your brain, altered by your addiction, incorrectly sends you the message that you need to use to survive. At the same time, you know you need to change your lifestyle. What a struggle!

It takes courage to start recovery, courage you have shown even by picking up this book to learn how to change your life for the better. By using your inner and outer resources, you can keep traveling along your recovery road, and be successful, no matter what is thrown your way. Stay courageous! You can do it!

Recovery begins as you commit!

To Get a Good Start:

  • Contact your physician! Have a check-up! Be honest! Follow all medical advice.
  • Practice abstinence from all addictive substances and behaviors.
  • Join a recovery program. Sit there, listen, and take it all in. You do not have to do a thing. Magic can happen if you just keep going back.
  • Accept recovery into your life. It takes work, but consider whatever event that got you into recovery as a blessing. Do whatever it takes to stay the course. As you progress along your path, acknowledge, nurture, and reward yourself.

It's in Your Hands - Honesty, Acceptance, Nutrition, Direction, Support - Five Keys for recovery!

Learn about the PINK CLOUD that is experienced in early recovery. You may not consciously want to use, the abstinence may feel wonderful, but when this “pink cloud” collapses (and it will), your fall to earthly reality will be much easier if you have begun building your recovery structure.

See yourself successfully completing your first steps!

If you want to start your recovery, don’t allow your addict self to sabotage what you want by indulging in, “I’ll do it soon,” or “I’ll be okay,” type of thinking. If you truly cannot begin now, set yourself up for success by taking action to ensure that you will follow through ASAP. Examples of taking action are: contacting a referral center and asking for help; making an appointment with a counselor for the first possible appointment time; going to a self-help support group meeting; or signing a clear and specific, time-limited contract with yourself and putting it in a visible place. Whatever you decide to do, commit, take whatever action you can, and follow through.

READY? GREAT! LET’S GET STARTED!

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Common Terms Related to Addiction Recovery

Common Terms in Addiction

Some common terms you will become familiar with during your recovery:

Approach, program, and structure will be used to mean the same thing.

Addict will refer to someone actively involved with any physical addictions or addictive behaviors, or at least has not yet embraced recovery.

Clean and sober will mean abstinence from mind-altering addictive drugs or addictive behaviors.

Drugs will include alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, over-the-counter and prescription medications, and processed food, especially (processed) sugar, sugar substitutes, and processed carbohydrates.

Feelings will mean emotional feelings and body sensations.

Higher Power, spirit, spiritual, Source, and The Source are used to mean the same thing.

Mental and emotional or mental-emotional are used to mean the same thing as psychological.

Recovery and recovering are used to describe an addict who is clean, or sustaining a maintenance addiction, and actively involved in a recovery program and personal growth.

Triggers and cues mean the same thing.

Using or use mean active involvement in any addiction or addictive behavior.

The 123 approach may not be enough!

Understand that, like every other addict, you can only stay clean by choosing to turn away from the darkness of your addiction and towards the light of recovery – one moment, one breath, one step, one day at a time. Know that every day, even every hour, that you are clean is a success for you. Your experience, knowledge, and confidence will build day by day.

Thriving Beyond Addiction offers you the knowledge that can enable you to have a second chance at a first-class life. And it’s yours if you choose it. Breathe slowly and deeply!

Feel your joy, love, & excitement!

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AN OVERVIEW: THE 7 TASK AREAS OF YOUR RECOVERING FUTURE MODEL

View Your Recovering Future Twice Daily

In early recovery, it’s generally best to follow a program that has worked for others. There’s no one approach that’s best for everyone. Today, you should have several options available to choose from. In early recovery, select a program that is easy and simple for you to follow. Your first program doesn’t need to be complicated or intense.

A thriving life demands an adaptable, flexible, and expandable style. The order of the following task areas is only a suggestion; however, all seven are important.

 Your Approach:   Learning and Using Effective Resources – How you enter and think about recovery highly affects your outcome.

Find: Support, guidance, modeling.

Develop: Recovery and spiritual practices.

Your Recovery Skills:  Foundation – Follow a path that has proven its value. Set up your recovery plan for primary and secondary addictions, create a relapse prevention plan, learn tools and strategies, and use reminders to remember to practice and to employ these tools and strategies often.

Your Awareness Opportunity – Use each opportunity to learn about yourself, recovery and relapse issues, tools and strategies, and faith; take responsibility, make clearer and better choices. Without awareness you have no chance to succeed.

Managing Your Life:  Responsibility – Managing change: Take care of yourself by developing your mental, emotional, nutritional, physical, social, and spiritual health, as well as your recovery and relationships. Find a recovery guide (someone who has already done this) to help you.

Your Personal Work:  Resolving and Managing Issues – Problem solving model: Examine addictions, family history, problem solving and conflict resolution styles; deal with emotions, physical and relationship issues, relapse triggers and symptoms, and Post Acute Withdrawal Symptoms (PAWS).

Your Personal Growth Expanding, Engaging, and Living Fully – Observe, assess, and evolve; pursue social, emotional, physical, and spiritual growth; engage in the purposeful life that you want.

Accept and Embrace Mental-Emotional Shifts

Your Mental Shifts:  Expanding Perception and Focus – Major mental and emotional (paradigm) shifts will happen when you gain significant knowledge and perspective about yourself. Your attitudes, beliefs, emotions, identity, self-esteem, recovery, and spirituality will all be affected and change.

 

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INTRODUCING YOUR RECOVERING FUTURE

Your Recovering Future

Your Recovering FutureTM – These highlight boxes assist you in creating a vision of your recovery in the future, to see how your life will change and to begin to feel the benefits of being in recovery.  Your Recovering Future is a powerful, positive image of your ideal recovery. Make this imagined recovering future so desirable that you’re compelled, in the present, to do whatever it takes to create it and keep it.   The YRF image that you see, hear, feel, taste, and smell needs to be realistic and obtainable.

A recovery program with a structure has to be at the heart of YRF. You’ll use that structure to help set yourself up for success. You’ll be molding and managing your recovery daily and reviewing it weekly, monthly, and yearly. The YRF model has three important aspects:

Structure is your friend!

Structure:

Set yourself up for success with a structure    that makes it easier to stay on your recovery path than it is to get off of it. If, on both sides of your recovery road, there are recovery reminders, supportive people, and a solid program, you’ll be aware when you’re sliding off – just like how you would know if you were running over speed bumps, hitting orange construction cones, or going up a steep embankment. Your structure makes it easier for you to go straight down your recovery track.

Vision:

Visualize the completion of your next positive recovering event or milestone, such as celebrating your next recovery chip, completing a step or a page n a recovery workbook, or attending a family event. Like a motion picture playing in your mind’s eye, imagine your future with all five senses – take a few minutes to do this every morning and at night. Make your vision as detailed an image as you can – or start with a simple snapshot that you can build on.

Acknowledge the total truth of what’s  happening today in relationship to Your Recovering Future. For example:

  • “I’m having a bad day. I want to use, but I have three days of clean time that I don’t want to throw away. My goal is to get 30 days clean. I’m not going to use because I want to feel proud of myself in My Recovering Future.”
  • “I’m excited, confused, and scared about starting my new recovering life, even though I hope it will be wonderful.”

Keep all negative beliefs and attitudes out of your speech and thoughts. It’s difficult to do this when, chances are, negative thoughts and emotions triggered you to engage in your addiction. Once you start thinking or saying, “I can’t do it,” or “It’s too hard,” or “F___ it – it’s not worth it,” RUN to the nearest phone and call someone in your recovery support group.

Action:

Setting yourself up for success is about taking action now. For example, if you need to do something next week that you know will trigger your addiction, right now, while you are thinking of it, arrange to be accompanied by a recovering friend(s) who can support and remind you to stay on task.

Remember to live your recovery one step at a time – but don’t lose the vision of your future. That way, your unconscious will adopt these new visions and assist you with creating Your Recovering Future.

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INTRODUCING RECOVERING INTELLIGENCE

Recovering IntelligenceTM – These highlight boxes focus on intelligent recovery options for building and maintaining your recovery.

Recovering Intelligence boxes remind you how to think, feel, and behave in order to create and maintain successful recovery. RI boxes help you to review what has worked and what hasn’t worked in your life; and to then build on what worked by adding knowledge, tools, strategies, and positive experiences to it.

  • To develop a high level of RI, you must do the following:
  • Accept and embrace self-awareness.
  • Develop the ability to observe yourself and your situation accurately.
  • Understand how to set up, work, and live an effective personal recovery program.
  • Learn the Seven Intelligences of Recovery. Develop and use them until they become part of who you are. (See list below.)
  • Understand how your past behavior, roles, strategies, situations, and decisions helped form the values, attitudes, and beliefs you have today.
  • Develop a basic understanding of who you are – your issues, your addict and sober personality, and the strengths that worked well for you in the past.
  • Understand self-development and actively engage in your personal growth.
  • Learn how to achieve your tasks, goals, and dreams and build Your Recovering FutureTM.

Neurotransmitters

The Seven Intelligences of Recovery

These intelligences can overlap. They are:

  • Emotional Intelligence: The ability to know your feelings and how to effectively deal with them.
  • Growth and Healing Intelligence: The ability to evaluate, learn, and grow; and to apologize, forgive, and heal from life injuries.
  • Intimacy Intelligence: The ability to open up, to trust, and to bond with important people in your life.
  • Resiliency Intelligence: The ability to bounce back from life’s setbacks and live a full life.
  • Social Intelligence: The ability or desire to know someone’s feelings and how to relate to them.
  • Spiritual Intelligence: The willingness and ability to open up to your Higher Power.
  • Success Intelligence: The ability to clarify what you need and want, then find and use the best resources to achieve your goals and dreams.

As Recovering Intelligence becomes your personal reminder of the kind of life and recovery you want, you’ll use it to build the vehicle that will carry you into your quality recovering lifestyle. Your Recovering Intelligence will give you the ability to create Your Recovering Future.

 

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Thriving Beyond Addiction’s Red Dot Reminder Check-in System

Red Dot Reminder

Red Dot Reminder Check-In System – Like a red stoplight or a hand signal at a crosswalk, these highlight boxes offer reminders of recovery skills, tools, and strategies.

When you see a Red Dot Reminder, it’s a cue for you to stop and focus on your recovery by:

  • Remembering to breathe and relax.
  • Observing yourself and your situation.
  • Reminding yourself what’s most important to your recovery.
  • Remind yourself that doing this check-in is helpful.

The Red Dot Reminders help you stay aware that there are forces within yourself that may undermine your recovery. Your own instincts, emotions and past behavioral patterns can thwart your desire for recovery. You have compelling reasons you seek recovery – the Red Dot Reminders help you remain aware of those reasons even when your past behavioral patterns try and reemerge.

Red Dot Reminder highlight boxes serve to keep you on track and remind you why you want a healthy recovering lifestyle. Examples are:

  • I need to feel proud of myself, to see a look of pride in my (family’s) face!
  • I want to live a spiritual driven life!
  • I want to be a good parent and a role model!
  • I want the best life I can have!
  • I want to live happy, joyous and free!
  • I never want to experience the negative consequences of addiction!
  • I’m sick and tired of being sick and tired!

Each time you check in with yourself, it’s a chance to consciously refocus. In time, the new behavior will sink into your unconscious mind and will become the new you!

Hand - Red Dot Reminder

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STARTING YOUR JOURNEY TO RECOVERY – IMPORTANT THINGS TO KNOW

Starting Your Journey
motion blurred road and cloudy blue sky background

There are several important things you need to know as you start your recovery:

  1. My book, Thriving Beyond Addiction, offers an ideal model. Strive for it, but feel okay with something less than ideal.
  2. You probably have many questions. Relax, breathe, get out of your own way, and engage in a recovery process that tens of thousands of people before you have successfully followed.
  3. I will offer many resources to help you clarify and find answers for the who, what, when, where, why, and how of recovery. It introduces you to traditional and cutting-edge recovery options. It helps you in adapting a program to meet your needs.
  4. The best approach for you is the one that fits or intuitively matches you, because you’re more likely to follow it. If you interpret this to mean an easy, simple, or limited approach, it’s doubtful that it will be effective. At the start, an excellent strategy is to embrace a universal, time-tested structure until you and your recovery support group members agree on how to improve your program. If you do change how you’re going to handle your recovery, stay active in your current approach until you are engaged in the new one.
  5. There may be some undesirable consequences in your decision to deal with your addiction. Examples are: you may need to let go of a true friend who’s still using, or your family might become upset because recovery is taking up a lot of your time.
  6. In your approach, you may need to let go of old beliefs, fears, and strategies that have guided your life thus far. This can be difficult; commit to new changes for a few weeks, and it’ll get easier. Your best approach will be a holistic one that includes:
  • Bio-Nutritional
  • Mental-Emotional
  • Learning-Growing
  • Relational-Social
  • Spiritual-Quantum Physics

Drug Free Means Life

  1. Whatever approach you choose, you must open up, become involved, and evolve. You may have to move out of your comfort zone. You don’t have to be enthusiastic or even like it, but you must be willing to go through the process. You may question whether you are changing and whether these changes will be permanent. Expect that others will have the same questions. Those closest to you will notice your behavioral and emotional changes, especially if you consistently follow your program to the best of your ability. Take this opportunity to be totally honest with yourself. Ask yourself the tough questions. Listen for the answers. Sharing your journey with other people will help make it real.
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Wake Up & Thrive

TBALogo

Move beyond your addiction and become who and what you really want to be!

The Thriving Beyond Addiction ™ model encourages you to move past your substance or behavioral addiction(s) and onto living your best recovering life!

The goal of Thriving Beyond Addiction is to offer you facts, resources, and wisdom about recovery in a user-friendly way. This information will help you to move through the recovery maze and onto better days. The process will be stimulating. Your beliefs will affect whether your experience will feel scary, sad, and limited, or happy, joyous, and free. If you accept that what you’re leaving behind is a destructive addiction, you’ll be more likely to embrace recovery.

A Defining Moment

I’m assuming you’ve had your moment-of-truth and that you’ve accepted that you are an addict. Hopefully, your Defining Moment brought you the clarity that it was time to accept the challenge of recovery. If not, ask yourself, why not? You may need to take a deeper look at your addiction, motivations, or goals. Take the Addiction Evaluation. Explore your answers for their accuracy and then make a decision. Do you want to recover?

If you want to help a loved one who suffers with an addiction, educate yourself so that you can be helpful when they’re ready to change.

TBA_Deep_Breathing

Breathe! – You’ll Be Okay

If you’re feeling down because you’re an addict and if in your mind you’re using words like “loser” or “stupid,” stop now. Give yourself a break! As Billy Joel sang in Second Wind, “You’re only human; you’re supposed to make mistakes.” The reality is that addiction is a human issue; many struggle with it to some degree. Among those who suffer from it, some struggle with addiction their whole life, while others are able to let go and embrace recovery.

It’s vital to know that you’re not responsible for your addiction, but you are responsible for your recovery. The family, genetic, nutritional, social, or spiritual issues that contributed to your addiction need to be managed, neutralized, or eliminated. You didn’t start out using alcohol, placing a bet or super-sizing your meal with the goal of becoming an addict. Yet, if you’ve had major life problems due to using and are not in recovery, you’re choosing to be ill. This is your Defining Moment! Please choose health!

Though emphasizing drug addiction, it is the approach is for those recovering from any addiction because:

  • The process of addiction and recovery is similar for all addictions.
  • Most addicts deal with two or more addictions. Recovery from all of them is best done at the same time, showing your total commitment to recovery.

Though recovery is similar for all addictions, there are some behavioral differences that may arise when recovering from individual addictions, such as:

  • An anorexic’s voice saying, “You’re fat.”
  • Intense shame for a female sex addict.
  • The constant need to “look good” for someone who is a codependent partner.
  • Physical damage from consumed substances.
  • Food addicts who are overweight.
  • Reward-seeking for the success and fame addict.

By understanding exactly what recovery is, it’s more likely you will embrace it. Recovery isn’t a one-time event. There are some addictions in which you can’t be totally abstinent from, such as food for the food addict and shopping for the shopaholic. Therefore, recover is a lifelong process of observing your behavior while adapting and moving toward a more positive and healthier lifestyle. To succeed, you’ll need to change some of your beliefs, thoughts, and behaviors. You are intelligent; you just need to learn about the tools and strategies for successful recovery. In recovery, you’ll learn to be happier and healthier. Not entering recovery is a decision to walk the path of self-destruction. Make a commitment to do whatever it takes. This will make it much easier to live your best life, for the rest of your life.

Taking Action

At a basic level, there are two things you need to do:

  • Choose to be abstinent or abuse. Consult your MD before you stop using physically addictive drugs.
  • Your body will naturally detoxify from drugs and sugar, but work with your medical doctor to ensure no damage is done to your body during the detox process.
  • Connect with yourself, others, and The Source.
    • Yourself: Connect with your thoughts, emotions and sensations, needs, motivations, and goals.
    • Others: Find supportive, knowledgeable, and objective people.
    • The Source: Find a spiritual guide or participate in a spiritual or religious practice.

It’s frustrating and even overwhelming to start a new life journey without knowing the rules. Don’t Allow Yourself to Get Overwhelmed! Start by taking a few deep breaths and honestly acknowledging your current situation. YOU NEED TO CHANGE!

To do this, you’ll have many tasks ahead of you, but you have the rest of your life to work on them, one day at a time, or even one minute at a time. Recovery will move you forward and help you to create new life goals. The key is to do whatever it takes to get started and to keep moving until you are successful.

The pilot of an airplane must go full throttle to get the plane off the ground. Once the plane is flying, the power can be reduced and the plane will stay in the air. It may take a major effort to get your recovery off of the ground, but once you’ve leveled off, it will be easier. In addition, your life will start to change in many positive ways.

Take a desirable action right now, this very moment, because action breaks up the negative emotions that keep you stuck, unhappy, and in your addiction.

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10 Most Common Signs of Addiction to Drugs or Alcohol

Anyone with these symptoms should seek treatment right away.

1. Cravings

A person may undergo more intense urges or cravings for the drug of choice or alcohol as the addiction progresses.

2. Physical dependence

A physical reliance or dependency on drugs develops as a person becomes accustomed to the constant presence and influence of the substance. The physiological changes that go along with this process may cause the individual to feel poorly or to function inadequately when the drug leaves the system.

3. Tolerance

Persistent use of a substance builds up a tolerance that will mean the individual will need for more of the drug or alcohol to achieve the desired effects.

4. Withdrawal symptoms

Some individuals experience symptoms of withdrawal with an abrupt end to using or when attempting to wean off the substance over a period of time. This is a strong indication of physiological dependency is developing.

5. Poor judgement

An individual is addicted to drugs or alcohol is often likely to do anything to obtain the substance, including such risky behaviors such as stealing, lying, engaging in selling drugs or unsafe sexual activity or other crimes that could lead to an arrest or jail

Drugs and Alcohol

6. Drug-seeking

A person who abuses drugs regularly will exhibit drug seeking behavior and will routinely attempt to obtain prescription medications, such as opioids or tranquilizers, from medical facilities, such as emergency rooms and doctors’ offices.

7. Financial problems

A person may spend large amounts of money, drain bank accounts, and destroy a budget in order to get the drug. This is a major red flag and should not be ignored.

8. Neglecting obligations

A classic sign of addiction is when an individual opts to using or getting the drug in preference to meeting work or personal responsibilities.

9. Fostering unhealthy alliances

A person with a drug or alcohol dependency often seeks out those with similar habits. These new groups may also encourage other unhealthy habits.

10. Isolation

An addict will usually withdraw and isolate from others, hiding drug use from friends and family. The behavior may occur because of the perceived stigma of a substance addiction or increased depression, anxiety or paranoia resulting from substance abuse.

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Summertime Setback Series – Part Three

Binge Eating Disorder

Binge Eating Disorder or BED is a food disorder in which a person frequently consumes large amounts of food in short periods and suffers severe guilt when finished. This disorder is exacerbated by anxiety and insecurity and, in turn, causes the vicious cycle to repeat over and over again. An individual who suffers from BED understands that it is cruel, humiliating and can strike at any moment of vulnerability.

During months where routine in predictable – September to June for those who work or are in school – binge eating can be easy enough to hide. Everyday practices are its best cover as we are in more control of our lives during these months. However, BED should not be dismissed during this time, nor should its warning signs be ignored.

During the holiday months, BED becomes much more punitive and often unbearable for those who experience the disorder.

Now that summer is here, for most people that usually means going to the beach with friends, hanging out by the pool, endless summer cookouts, shorts and tank tops, and the anxieties that can arise along with wearing a swimsuit. If you are one of the millions with an eating disorder, this time of year may make it even harder to manage your symptoms. Body image issues often resurface and maintaining a healthy relationship with food becomes more challenging.

Summer is a time to relax and recharge, but it is important to stay committed to your recovery. Here’s why:

  • The increased “free time” that occurs during summer tends to create more “alone time” and eating disorder behaviors thrive in isolation and secrecy.
  • Body image issues may increase during summer months, as we tend to wear less clothing and show more skin.
  • Wearing a bathing suit can be particularly challenging for many.
  • The lack of structure in the summer months can lead to unhealthy routines like skipping meals or altering your normal sleep habits. This can make eating disorder and mental health symptoms worse.
  • Changes in the summer schedule can lead to an increase in physical activity and excessive exercise.
  • Co-occurring mental health issues like depression and substance abuse benefit from treatment and are not likely to go away in summer months.
  • Getting back into activities with “old friends” or even “new friends” can add to the social demand and thus increase overall stress.
  • Eating disorder behaviors may be exacerbated if stress increases due to new activities (taking courses or starting a new job) in summer.
  • Eating disorders are challenging to treat, require specialized treatment and have a high relapse rate. Anorexia nervosa, in particular, has the highest mortality rate of all mental health issues.
  • The longer that you wait to seek help for an eating disorder, the sicker you may become, making future treatment even more challenging.

But if you are struggling, or know that a loved one is struggling, do not delay seeking help any time of year. Call a professional for guidance. The courage you draw upon to choose treatment now will inevitably lead to improved outcomes and improved well-being.

Important information about Binge Eating Disorder

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH),Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most commonly diagnosed eating disorder in the country and is defined by eating large quantities of food ” as much as 5,000-15,000 calories ” in a single sitting, then experiencing feelings of guilt and shame as a result. Binge sessions may occur after a period of stringent caloric restriction or dieting and they are often characterized by feelings of a loss of control.

Those who struggle with binge eating are often overweight or obese and, as a result, are likely to struggle with medical problems such as heart disease, some cancers, high blood pressure, gallbladder disease, high levels of “bad” cholesterol, and/or type II diabetes.

  • An estimated two-thirds of people living with binge eating disorder are obese.
  • Binge eating contributes to the development of obesity, which in turn can trigger a host of chronic health disorders, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
  • Binge eating disorder is the most commonly diagnosed eating disorder, and an estimated 3 percent of Americans are living with the problem. Additionally, about 50 percent of patients with BED are also diagnosed with depression, 24 percent are diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and 44 percent self-report struggling with eating habit management.
  • Cortisol released during the stress response and the corresponding storage of fat in the abdominal area are increased issues for those living with BED and obesity as compared to the general public, according to a study published in the journal Appetite. Stress can also be a trigger for binge eating.
  • Binge eating has been linked to increased rates of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, especially if the person with BED struggles with feelings of low self-worth and/or feels lacking.
  • People living with binge eating disorder very often also struggle with disrupted sleep patterns, including difficulty falling asleep, waking at night to eat, and struggling to go back to sleep.
  • The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases reports that people living with binge eating disorder are at higher risk of developing such health problems as headaches, joint and muscle pain, sleep apnea, digestive problems, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis, kidney disease, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, certain cancers, and fatty liver disease. They also experience difficulty in getting or maintaining a healthy pregnancy.

For BED victims, though it may not feel like it now, it does get better. Here are a few extra tips to help with your recovery, keep you on track and reduce the possibility of relapse.

  • Set regular times for eating, but be careful about it. Do not starve yourself by allocating inconvenient times for a meal. The more control you have over food, the more you will find control in your mind.
  • Look at food in a positive manner. Food is not an enemy but key to your survival. Learn to manage food intake to your benefit and overall health.

Most importantly, accept that some days are better than others. Do not blame yourself if you don’t feel invincible every day. Accept that you had a moment of weakness and continue to strive for a better day and a healthier future.

Good luck and have a Happy Summer!

 

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Wake Up and Thrive – Move beyond your addiction and become who and what you really want to be!